Saturday Night Session 037: Dash Berlin discusses a new addition to his family and reveals new music is on the way

Saturday Night Session 037: Dash Berlin discusses a new addition to his family and reveals new music is on the wayDash Berlin Jeffrey Sutorius Solo

Few moments are more sacred than the reprieve Saturday night provides from the daily grind of school and work. Its importance is meant to be emphasized, and thus, a feature dedicated to “doing the night right” was born. Saturday Night Sessions are set around energizing mixes meant to get the party started. New or old, each episode has one cornerstone thing in similarity: they serve as the perfect backdrop for the weekend pregame.

Dash Berlin is many things. It is a musical moniker; it is a story; he is Jeffrey Sutorius. It has been nearly 15 years since Dash Berlin began in the Netherlands. In 2006, the two words comprised the musical moniker of three Dutch men named Eelke Kalberg, Sebastiaan Molijn, and Jeffrey Sutorius. Although it was a three person group, Dash Berlin was seemingly the name and face of one of these men- Jeffrey Sutorius. This was perhaps by design, but each person played their part when it came to the musical output and performance of the group. Kalberg and Molijn focused on music production and Sutorius focused on live performance and marketing as the face of the brand. Together the trio were unstoppable, and they quickly gained popularity within the European and later the North American and global electronic music scene.

It is now 2020 and Dash Berlin is the moniker and face of one remaining member, Sutorius. The Dash Berlin moniker faced years of legal battles that resulted in Sutorius producing and touring under his own name for a period of time. He has returned as Dash Berlin, and fans have rejoiced for what is to come now that the frontman is back in the drivers seat and running the project as a solo artist.

The Berlin moniker has put out a single a year between 2017 and 2019, and Sutorius promises he has a stream of new music that is to come from Berlin for 2020 and beyond. He comments on this saying, “I’m trying to restructure the way to release my music, and this is taking way more time than anticipated. For now people just have to wait. I’ve received many many questions about this and all I can say now is: Be patient and I hope it’s worth the wait!”

Many artists are using the recent uptick in time at home to produce more material than they would be able to do if they were still touring. Sutorius says that not touring has been a big adjustment, but it has come during a fortuitous time for his personal life. He reveals, “Some of the Dashers know that recently I’ve became a dad of a now two month old. In that sense, I’m very happy to be at home where at the same time it’s challenging to be ‘stuck’ in your house 24/7.” He continues, “I can’t wait to start touring again. I’ve had the pleasure to always been in an environment where people are genuine happy and letting go of everyday struggles. Can you imagine the first party after all this?”

While it is hard to imagine a return to normalcy in light of the global COVID-19 pandemic, Sutorius has crafted an exclusive hour-long mix for his Saturday Night Session that will transport the listener to a carefree time at a club. Sutorius promises that fans will be transported to a ‘Dash Berlin Live DJ Session!’ and that he ‘hope to see you guys on the dance floor again, soon.’

Photo: Rukes

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Well, we are all stuck at home. What does a day for you look like right now?

We’re all in this together and trying keep keep ourselves occupied with work or honey related stuff. For me it’s exactly the same. I just hope that everyone is safe and healthy. Crazy times nobody thought of or saw coming.

How big of an adjustment is it for you now that you aren’t touring? Is this a welcome break?

Some of the Dashers know that recently I’ve became a dad of a now two month old. In that sense, I’m very happy to be at home where at the same time it’s challenging to be “stuck” in your house 24/7. I can’t wait to start touring again. I’ve had the pleasure to always been in an environment where people are genuine happy and letting go of everyday struggles. Can you imagine the first party after all this?

Your recent battle to regain control of Dash Berlin has been so public. Can you tell us a little more about your health; how you are doing; about YOU now that this is all over?

Actually I do not want to go over this. What done is done, and for people who want to know, read the exclusive online interview I did for DJ Mag regarding that situation.

What can we expect from you this year when it comes to original releases?

As much as possible. I’m trying to restructure the way to release my music, and this is taking way more time than anticipated. For now people just have to wait. I’ve received many many questions about this and all I can say now is: Be patient and I hope it’s worth the wait!

Since you come from a musical family and grew up playing the drums, have you ever considered performing with instruments during your live sets?

Not really, although the influence can be super cool if you do it right! But never say never, I do have to start picking up drumming again though. But timewise I think I can divide my time in a better way.

What inspired you to start writing out notes for fans on an ipad during your live sets?

Trying to look for a way of extra connection, besides music and visuals. Over time I’ve learned that using the iPad was a super nice idea. In a club. Not perse on a big festival, as the majority of the crowd cannot see what I’m trying to get across on a tiny iPad screen. Above & Beyond is doing this in a perfect way and consistently.

What kind of a Saturday night is your Saturday Night Session going to get fans ready for?

A Dash Berlin Live DJ Session! Hope to see you guys on the dance floor again, soon.

Apollo 13 is playing out live, now, in a story told in newly-restored sound

The human experience has been changed by images of space, but the power of sound to tell the story is unfolding in new ways. So here’s a different kind of live stream this weekend – re-broadcast from inside NASA Mission Control, 50 years ago.

We’re in a weird moment with the the world economy on pause – maybe the exact opposite of the literally rocket-fueled science and tech explosion that drove the United States to run the Apollo project. But it’s perhaps the perfect moment to focus on what really is “essential” about lots of work – how we fit together. History is an important way to do that, because we have the clarity of perspective and hindsight.

If you read the most recent issue of NASA’s History Division newsletter, you get more on the incredible Katherine Johnson – a reminder that a mathematician was as important to the space program as an astronaut (not to mention that this effort was not only male and white). Dr. Johnson has some words that are inspiring for anyone facing new situations (which I guess at the moment is all of us): ” We wrote our own textbook, because there was no other text about space. We just started from what we knew. We had to go back to geometry and figure all of this stuff out,” NASA quotes her as saying.

So a new complete digitization of multichannel audio from inside Mission Control paints a vivid picture. It also reveals (as I’ve said previously, after talking to a couple of them) – astronauts and engineers use listening and sound in order to be aware of their spacecraft.

Government agency plus internal historical newsletter is usually a recipe for utter boredom, but this is anything but dry. Catherine Baldwin from the NASA History Center describes the result in poetic, musical terms:

You can hear the polyphony of voices, slowly adding to the fray, as each member of Mission Control realizes the magnitude of the problem. In real time, you hear the team discuss the problem and offer solutions, one after the other. The stress is palpable, and the strain in their voices is audible. Then, suddenly, you hear the long, anxiety-filled silences before instructions are sent to the astronauts.

That whole newsletter is a fun read:

https://history.nasa.gov/nltrc.pdf

Ben Feist, a historian and software engineer at NASA, has led the restoration effort of Apollo 13’s audio following projects for Apollo 11 and 17, the first and last human lunar missions, respectively. The project is NASA-funded but also the fruits of a lot additional labor by volunteers.

The interface is stunning, too … individual channels of audio for each chair in Houston.

There are 50 channels of audio, for a total of 7500 hours of sound – and, most notably, the rediscovery of big Ampex reel-to-reels containing the fateful explosion in the Service Module’s oxygen take. Astronauts hearing that sound on the the spacecraft (and Mission Control over their relay) gave the first impression that the crisis was more than a faulty reading or two. But you can also hear a vivid conversation between Mission Control and the astronauts describing vibrations and sound at each stage of the launch – a reminder that this sort of sensory awareness of your vehicle is as important to someone on top of a Saturn V rocket as it is someone figuring out what’s happening in their Ford Taurus on the highway.

Baldwin notes in her article that there are also moments captured from phoning up Vice President Agnew to a guy getting rejected when he asks a lady on a date.

For us sound nerds, though, the whole project is an epic accomplishment of digitization an restoration, as well as a stunning portrait of the importance of sound in telling stories. I had a first-hand childhood connection to this and Apollo 13. The Command Module lived in the science museum in my hometown of Louisville, Kentucky when I grew up. And various extended loops of these very conversations between the spacecraft and ground played in the installation. One unique aspect of sound to me is not that auditory or visual sense is primary over the other – if you listen in on sound, that is, you imagine all the rest. While we struggle now to bombard ourselves with video conferences, that might be worth considering.

Our imagination of space flight is often more influenced by science fiction than reality. I think we all have to resist our idea that space is a combination of long, Stanley-Kubrick-esque silences interspersed with Ligeti, or the gentle hum of the Enterprise. A former ISS commander told me that the space station is loud (particularly the raucous machinery in the older Russian end of the ship – no surprise).

But I do hope that we extend the awareness of the aural in space, space exploration, and technology. I think that chapter in our appreciation is just beginning. Four years ago I got to collaborate with the European Space Agency on this topic; ESA is staying at home, too, so we all get a chance to think about this. And if at the moment there are no DJ booths for us to inhabit, musicians and sound artists have some time now for us to reflect on our other relevance to communication, understanding, and science.

Apashe blends trap, hip-hop, and classical influences on full-length LP, ‘Renaissance’

Apashe blends trap, hip-hop, and classical influences on full-length LP, ‘Renaissance’Apashe Credit Adrian Villagomez 2

Apashe has been teasing his new album Renaissance since late 2019 with the release of “Distance,” a gorgeous collaboration with a full-sized orchestra. Following “Distance,” Apashe then unloaded two high-profile collaborations with Russian rapper Instasamka and Tech N9ne in January and February, respectively. With hype at a fever pitch, Apashe’s full Renaissance album has finally been released, and it’s well worth the wait.

Overflowing with orchestral influences, big brass and magnificent strings are weaved into each track, while still maintaining a unique edge driven by Apashe’s affinity for trap and hip-hop. Speaking to Dancing Astronaut on the production of Renaissance, Apashe said,

“Classical music is so pure and electronic music is so raw, I have always loved to fuse them together. For this album I tried to do what has barely been done before in the electronic music scene: compose with a symphonic orchestra, extract its epic-ness and delicacy, then blend it with something big and rough”

The juxtaposition of modern electronic music with renaissance-era orchestra is a well-rounded blend of sonics that showcases the best in Apashe’s production repertoire. Stream Apashe’s Renaissance album below.

Photo Credit: Adrian Villagomez

Techno pioneer Kevin Saunderson tests positive for coronavirus

Techno pioneer Kevin Saunderson tests positive for coronavirusKevin Saunderson

A foundational figure in the techno movement, Kevin Saunderson has tested positive for coronavirus, according to a video that the producer published on his Facebook page on April 7. In the video, Saunderson delineates the symptoms that he experienced for a 14-day period before completing testing and receiving confirmation that he had indeed contracted the novel respiratory virus.

On April 8, Saunderson followed his initial video with another updating his following on his current condition. Although he admittedly “didn’t expect the result” he received, Saunderson assured viewers that he is self-isolating and slowly but surely on the mend.

Super Duper drops another upbeat twofer with ‘Do It For Myself / Be Right There’ [Stream]

Super Duper drops another upbeat twofer with ‘Do It For Myself / Be Right There’ [Stream]SD 19 A

Following the success of his previous double single, which received support from Spotify‘s official Indie Pop and Outliers playlists as well as Apple Music‘s Pure Workout, Super Duper is back with another twofer releasing “Do It For Myself / All On You” via FADER Label. The first bundle marked a strong start to 2020 for the Nashville-based producer, featuring vocalist and former Jai Wolf-collaborator Mr. Gabriel, and he’s only just begun the journey into new soundscapes.

The new singles are unique from one another, lead by an upbeat and energetic melody in “Do It For Myself,” which features motivational vocals and feel-good piano riffs. Super added some remarks on the first single:

“I’ve had this track for a couple of years and never knew what to do with it. While writing I pulled inspiration from Ace of Base and 90’s hip-hop which was a fun era to play in. It’s probably one of the most upbeat and happy songs I’ve ever done,”

The second offering follows the optimistic theme of the first, as “Be Right There” puts his production prowess into the limelight, combining harmonizing leads, polyrhythm vocals, and organic percussion. The tracks are a welcomed dose of positivity, coming packaged with the announcement of his upcoming Prelude EP, which is set for a June 2020 release.

Feeling generous, Eric Prydz gives fans a new mix of ‘The Gift’

Feeling generous, Eric Prydz gives fans a new mix of ‘The Gift’02 23 19 EricPrydz ByOffBrandProject. 26

What better way for Eric Prydz to drop the long-sought after EPIC Mix of his 2005 single, “The Gift,” than by wrapping it in a digital bow and bequeathing it to fans during these trying times?

The abrupt release strays from the Swedish producer’s recent trend of PRYDA 15 EPs, and we can mostly thank Twitter user @Assadk, who, upon asking Prydz if he’ll ever release the track, was told that it’ll drop whenever their social media interaction received 2,000 likes. Now, nearly 1200 days and an impressive 2,000 likes later, Eric Prydz lived up to his word and dropped this heat-seaking house hitter.

Prydz’ EPIC spin on “The Gift,” uses a punchy, rolling bass line to reinvigorate the Pryda classic into modern times. “Dance away,” sings the vocal harmonies, as meticulous layers of synths, pads, and strings show why Prydz’ personal vault of unreleased gems is one of the industry’s most coveted treasures. Listen to a stream below, and grab an official FREE download of the track’s WAV over on Eric’s Soundcloud.

Burning Man cancels 2020 event

Burning Man cancels 2020 eventBurning Man

It was only a matter of time before the Burning Man Organization made the official announcement that this year’s trip back to the playa would be canceled due to the global pandemic.

After indefinitely postponing the official sale, it looks like the Org has decided, with good reason and heavy-hearts, to cancel the event for the first time in its history.

“After much listening, discussion, and careful consideration, we have made the difficult decision not to build Black Rock City in 2020. Given the painful reality of COVID-19, one of the greatest global challenges of our lifetimes, we believe this is the right thing to do. Yes, we are heartbroken. We know you are too. In 2020 we need human connection and Immediacy more than ever. But public health and the well-being of our participants, staff, and neighbors in Nevada are our highest priorities.”

Read the complete statement here

Deadmau5 and Steve Duda revive BSOD project, deliver four-track ‘No Way, Get Real’ EP

Deadmau5 and Steve Duda revive BSOD project, deliver four-track ‘No Way, Get Real’ EPDeadmau5 2019 1

Deadmau5 and Steve Duda bring back their BSOD collaboration with an all new four-track EP, No Way, Get Real, 14 years after the joint project’s last delivery. The act first formed in 2005 as a joke between the two friends though the pair would ironically go on to top the Beatport charts with their first track “This Is the Hook”—a parody of popular dance music with vocoded tongue-in-cheek lyrics, “I like the bass, it’s catchy, you like it” and “this is the hook, it’s catchy, you like it.”

Although No Way, Get Real doesn’t have lyrical content, the gritty sound design and hard-hitting electro house hooks take center stage in four well-crafted mau5trap exports.

“Afterburner” is a masterful intro with an anthemic build, broken up by hypnotizing synths that bounce along a sharp percussion arrangement. “Allpassing Lane” runs with a funky walking bass line wile sparkling accents dance around the gritty lead. “Fives” lands as the project’s longest track, polished by anticipatory builds towards more electro-symphonic tension. A glimpse of the duo’s humor can be seen in “Pitches Love Me”—a barrage of hefty glitches that ultimately culminate into hard electro-funk.

Featured image: Matt Barnes

Nocturnal Wonderland joins wave of digital festivals with virtual Rave-A-Thon

Nocturnal Wonderland joins wave of digital festivals with virtual Rave-A-Thon69931875 2914599738556105 3017858177828913152 O

In Pasquale Rotella‘s latest “State of Insomniac,” he addressed the possibility of cancelling Nocturnal Wonderland 2020. Given the current health concerns around the world as well as Insomniac‘s upcoming expansion plans, it seems tough to roll the tides for Southern California’s premier EDM festival.

However, they’ve raised a solution to hold fans over, taking it digital for an official virtual “Rave-A-Thon” event, similar to the EDC and HARD Summer virtual events in recent weekends. Set to go live tonight (April 10) at 11:00 p.m. ET / 8:00 p.m. PT, the festival will stream on Insomniac’s YouTube channel for a two-day isolation fiesta. The virtual event includes performances by 12th Planet, Arty, Borgore, Zeds Dead, Champagne Drip, and more.

Nocturnal Wonderland joins the ranks of other virtual festivals including Brownies & Lemonade‘s Digital Mirage, Minecraft’s tribute to the Porter Robinson-curated Second Sky, and Sirius XM’s Ultra Music Festival broadcast.