Tomorrowland shares all sets from digital festival: Watch

Tomorrowland has shared all the sets from last week’s digital festival.

Tomorrowland Around The World took place last weekend (25th and the 26th July), with the first ever digital edition of the festival accessible by tablet, smartphone and laptop, and over 1,000,000 fans tuning in to watch their favourite DJs. The Belgian festival spared no expense with the online alternative, curating eight different Tomorrowland “stages”, including Atmosphere, Core, Freedom Stage, and Elixir. There was even a mainstage with the festival’s 2020 theme, The Reflection of Love – Chapter 1

As of yesterday (29th), Tomorrowland’s Relive on-demand video platform opened to allow people who bought a weekend ticket or package to “revisit the magical island of Pāpiliōnem”, with the sets available to watch back online for the next two weeks. The Inspiration Sessions and workshops will also be available until August 12th 2020.

Among the acts to perform were Oliver Heldens, Afrojack, Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike, Nervo, and a special appearence from Katy Perry. Elsewhere, ANNA, Adam Beyer and Charlotte de Witte took over the core stage, and Eric Prydz, Claptone, and Solardo all performed on the Freedom stage.

Fans who weren’t able to attend the festival last weekend can also still purchase a separate ticket online that gives access to the platform.

Following the debut of EPIC 6.0 at Tomorrowland’s flagship 2019 festival, Eric Prydz announced a brand new concept for this year’s digital edition: [CELL.].

 

Lane 8 and OTR come together for indie-infused single, ‘Shatter’

Lane 8 and OTR come together for indie-infused single, ‘Shatter’39907533 325345211364687 4016470170439516160 N

The Lane 8 material continues. After putting out a steady supply of singles, several seasonal mixtapes, and a full-length album this year, the producer has now teamed up with OTR for a new single, “Shatter.”

“Shatter” sees the producers channel indie-electronic undertones. Light notes dance their way through the introduction, accompanied by mysterious builds that carry the listener through to a breathy release. The single is short and sweet and finds a way to instill a sense of calm.

“Shatter” follows “Run.” The collaborative effort is out now via This Never Happened.

Featured image: Lane 8/Instagram

A trance event is planned to go ahead in Croatia in August

A trance event is planned to go ahead in Croatia in August.

With events cancelled weekly amid the global COVID-19 pandemic, and the likes of Tomorrowland taking their 2020 instalments on line, Croatia’s trance and progressive AWAKE have confirmed they attend to go ahead with the event next month.

With a reduced capacity of 1,000 party go-ers, the event will take place on Zrce Beach from the 20th to the 23rd August, with performances from the likes of Aly & Fila, Cosmic Gate, Paul Thomas and Paul van Dyk. Several other Croatian festivals, including Dimensions and Outlook, were either postponed or cancelled earlier this year.

Elsewhere, the BPM festival, which is scheduled to take place in September in Malta, has caused conflict on social media between those for and opposing the event. Some are even calling for the boycott of the festival amid a petition, which currently has over 15,000 signees, to halt mass gatherings in Malta.

In an article from Maltese news outlet The Shift, they shared that The Medical Association of Malta had criticised Tourism Minister Julia Farrugia Portelli and the Malta Tourism Authority (MTA) for promoting mass events actively “creating grave danger of a major and uncontrollable epidemic”, and statements made by Prime Minister Robert Abela which have “encouraged people not to comply with the recommendations of the Superintendent of Public Health”.

Festivals around the world have had to be cancelled or postponed due the COVID-19 pandemic since March this year, along with countless club closures and tour cancellations. While the pandemic has led to several festivals moving into the world of live-streaming, or even the virtual world, some reports suggest that the festival industry is under threat of total collapse.

A trance festival is planned to go ahead in Croatia in August

A trance festival is planned to go ahead in Croatia in August.

With festivals cancelled weekly amid the global COVID-19 pandemic, and the likes of Tomorrowland taking their 2020 instalments on line, Croatia’s trance and progressive AWAKE festival have confirmed they attend to go ahead with the event next month.

With a reduced capacity of 1,000 party go-ers, the festival will take place on Zrce Beach from the 20th to the 23rd August, with performances from the likes of Aly & Fila, Cosmic Gate, Paul Thomas and Paul van Dyk. Several other Croatian festivals, including Dimensions and Outlook, were either postponed or cancelled earlier this year.

Elsewhere, the BPM festival, which is scheduled to take place in September in Malta, has caused conflict on social media between those for and opposing the event. Some are even calling for the boycott of the festival amid a petition, which currently has over 15,000 signees, to halt mass gatherings in Malta.

In an article from Maltese news outlet The Shift, they shared that The Medical Association of Malta had criticised Tourism Minister Julia Farrugia Portelli and the Malta Tourism Authority (MTA) for promoting mass events actively “creating grave danger of a major and uncontrollable epidemic”, and statements made by Prime Minister Robert Abela which have “encouraged people not to comply with the recommendations of the Superintendent of Public Health”.

Festivals around the world have had to be cancelled or postponed due the COVID-19 pandemic since March this year, along with countless club closures and tour cancellations. While the pandemic has led to several festivals moving into the world of live-streaming, or even the virtual world, some reports suggest that the festival industry is under threat of total collapse.

Phoebe Bridgers captures the triumphal chaos that is “I Know the End” [Video]

Indie-rock artist Phoebe Bridgers made her name with her debut LP Stranger in the Alps and two music groups boygenius and Better Oblivion Community Center. This week, Bridgers drops the video to accompany the closer on her sophomore album Punisher, the screamo ballad “I Know the End.”  The accompanying video complements her notable stream of consciousness writing style as it provides glimpses into the mysterious and vulnerable mind of Bridgers.

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The music video for “I Know the End” may not have a clear, cohesive storyline to follow, but that feels like Bridgers’ point. In a statement on Apple Music, Bridgers remarks how for the song, she wanted “to write about driving up the coast to Northern California, which I’ve done a lot in my life. It’s like a super specific feeling. This is such a stoned thought, but it feels kind of like purgatory to me, doing that drive, just because I have done it at every stage of my life, so I get thrown into this time that doesn’t exist when I’m doing it, like I can’t differentiate any of the times in my memory. I guess I always pictured that during the apocalypse, I would escape to an endless drive up north.”

The past, present, and future intertwine and flash in and out of each other. With the way Bridgers writes up a scene with different visions of America and adds allusions to film The Wizard of Oz, she blends with the nostalgic familiarity. The images have no definite sense of time but that was never the intention. The music blends two completely different styles and Bridgers doesn’t care. Both in the song itself and in the video, she throws things together, and it ends up creating a sense of wholehearted deliverance that makes the song so unique.

At the end of the video, Bridgers makes out with an old woman, who resembles Bridgers with her white hair. Bridgers literally embraces old age and the inevitability of death, reflecting her lyric of “No, I’m not afraid to disappear. A billboard ends reading ‘THE END IS NEAR.’”

Connect with Phoebe Bridgers: Website | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter

FLOHIO drops new track and visuals, ‘GLAMOURISED’: Watch

FLOHIO has shared a new track and music video.

The South London MC, who teamed up with Mike Skinner of The Streets for his single ‘How Long’s It Been?’ in July last year, has dropped a surprise new single, ‘GLAMOURISED’, alongside a youtube-exclusive video.

The track, produced by longtime collaborator HLMNSRA, features a dizzying, synth-heavy instrumental, with FLOHIO’s hard-hitting flow and delivery in the spotlight on the dark visuals.

Check out ‘GLAMOURISED’ below.

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Last year, FLOHIO released a single ‘Way2‘. Directed by Tom Gullam and Ethan Barrett, a gritty, black and white accompanying video followed the British-Nigerian artist around the city as she rhymes about staying hopeful, repping South, and when the hype on Instagram doesn’t match your bank account.

Diamond Formation URL digital festival to benefit staff of iconic Chicago clubs, city charities

Diamond Formation URL digital festival to benefit staff of iconic Chicago clubs, city charitiesAriel Zetina

On August 1, music enthusiasts can aid staff of iconic Chicago clubs and a collection of the city’s community-based charities by streaming Diamond Formation URL. A digital festival curated by Smartbar’s Ariel Zetina, Diamond Formation URL will specifically benefit staff of Metro/Smartbar who are in need of relief, Brave Space Alliance, Afrorack, Molasses Chicago, and Little Village Solidarity Network, organizations that broadly seek to benefit the black and Latinx community.

The virtual rave, developed to spotlight queer sounds and scenes in the United States, will feature DJ Stingray, Akua, Ariel Zetina, SWISHA, Kush Jones, and Miss Twink USA, among a host of other artists. Diamond Formation URL, hosted in partnership with Red Bull, represents Zetina’s “dream lineup,” according to the Chicago-based artist, who proudly identifies as a Latinx transgender woman.

Diamond Formation URL is a natural complement to the inclusive aims of Diamond Formation, which seeks to introduce fresh new sounds to dance floors around the world while simultaneously uplifting transgender listeners and people of color.

Diamond Formation URL will stream live from Metro/Smartbar’s Mixcloud Pro on August 1. Speaking on her motivation to coordinate the digital event, Zetina said,

“Diamond Formation has always tried to represent artists who are shaking things up in their scene, and how they use but also move away from house and techno. The online version of Diamond Formation will be the longest Diamond Formation that has happened, so I am excited for all of the different music that will be able to fit into the window.”

Diamond Formation URL digital festival to benefit staff of iconic Chicago clubs, city charitiesRedbull

Featured image: @ColectivoMultipolar/Instagram


Make no mistake—dance music is born from black culture. Without black creators, innovators, selectors, and communities, the electronic dance music we hold so dear would simply not exist. In short, dance music is deeply indebted to the global black community and we need to be doing more. Black artists and artists of color have played a profound role in shaping the sound and culture of dance music and now more than ever, it is necessary for everyone in the music community to stand up for the people that have given us so much. Dancing Astronaut pledges to make every effort to be a better ally, a stronger resource, and a more accountable member of the global dance music community. Black Lives Matter—get involved here:  

Black Lives Matter

My Block My Hood My City

National Lawyers Guild Mass Defense Program

Black Visions Collective

Colin Kaepernick’s Know Your Rights Legal Defense Initiative

The Bail Project

The Next Level Boys Academy

Color of Change

Committee to Protect Journalists

How video signal processing emerged as real-time art

As we continue giving you the virtual version of the electronic media and music festivals you’ve been missing, here’s a flashback to a fascinating history of video processing as art form.

In 2014, Owego, New York’s Signal Culture celebrated the launch of The Emergence of Video Processing Tools: Television Becoming Unglued. It’s a fascinating look into the evolution of video signal as artistic medium – and a nice visual analog (literally) to the parallel worlds of digital and analog signal processing in roughly the same period. It’s also just the sort of raw form of this medium that draw many artists today, as they look for ways to better understand video and image in their own work, and push them forward.

There’s a really entertaining panel, which oddly makes me … miss panels with audiences in ways I had already forgotten. Please – help us escape Zoom. Wear a mask. Take care. New Museum in NYC hosted the talk with the editors, Sherry Miller Hocking, Kathy High, and Mona Jimenez.

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More on the book:

The book, from U Chicago Press.

Beginning in the late 1960s, artists and technologists began to custom-create hardware and software for real-time manipulation of video signals through original designs or as hacks to devices common to television production. Contemporary artists and tool designers continue this work in analog and digital domains in an expanded media environment. This program will bring focus to the social and artistic dimensions of custom tool development, and to the dual impulses to create new instruments and conserve and use older ones. In conversation will be inventor Dave Jones, whose video instruments span forty years, artists-designers Kyle Lapidus and Tali Hinkis of LoVid, Rhizome conservator Dragan Espenschied, and Hank Rudolph of the artist space Signal Culture and the Experimental Television Center.

The panel marks and celebrates the publication of The Emergence of Video Processing Tools: Television Becoming Unglued, edited by Kathy High, Sherry Miller Hocking, and Mona Jimenez (Intellect Books, 2014). Documentation of this panel was shot and edited by Signal Culture staff and volunteers Janeen Lamontagne, Robert Hoffman, Debora Bernagozzi and Jason Bernagozzi. For more still images from the panel, go to flickr.com/photos/signalculture/sets/72157645754376223/

They’ve got some performances up, too, like this from Eric Souther:

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Or this from Colleen Keough:

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Oh, and hey, Benton! (People I haven’t seen in a long while!)

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I recognize this is six years behind, but someone did just post it to my feed for some reason. I lost whatever that post was. But normally when I do this on CDM, it sparks some other discussion so – spark away.

The book is hard to acquire now, it seems, so I’m curious what has happened to all these projects. Now would be a great time for the international media art community to do more with signal for visuals.

And I really covet this book if, uh, someone at The University of Chicago Press Books department is still working in media relations and wants to help me celebrate Christmas in July.

https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/distributed/E/bo15981361.html

deadmau5 launches customizable performance software for digital artists, musicians

deadmau5 launches customizable performance software for digital artists, musiciansDeadmau5 2019 1

Fresh out of deadmau5‘s vault comes OSC/PILOT, a software that has been an integral component of the producer’s live artistry since 2013. The customizable platform, which enables creatives to communicate with any MIDI-using DAW, has newly been made available to the public, after years of use as deadmau5’s control surface for his shows.

The customizable tool could be a valuable addition to any artist’s arsenal given its interoperability with a variety of applications including Bitwig, AbletonLive, and TouchDesigner. This interoperability enables digital audio and visual designers to control a space’s content with data from another desired space, with an overarching goal of facilitating streamlined UI construction.

OSC/PILOT, which supports Windows 8.1 and 10, retails for $49.99 and can be purchased here. View the demo for the novel tool below.

Featured image: Matt Barnes