Watch The Weeknd’s Super Bowl 2021 Halftime Show in full

The Weeknd’s Super Bowl LV Halftime Show is now available to watch online.

During last night’s Super Bowl LV (7th), which saw the Tampa Bay Buccaneers defeat the Kansas City Chiefs, Canadian artist The Weekend performed during the game’s coveted 15-minute Halftime slot.

Joining legendary Halftime acts such as Beyoncé, Madonna, Prince and Stevie Wonder, The Weeknd, real name Abel Tesfaye, performed solo, backed up by a choir, band and dancers.

Against a city skyline set, Tesfaye performed to 25,000 people – as well as 30,000 cutouts — some of his more recent hits like ‘Blinding Lights’ and ‘Save Your Tears’, as well as a throwback in the form of his 2011 track, ‘House Of Balloons’.

You can watch the full performance below via YouTube. 

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Last year, The Weeknd teamed up with Calvin Harris for their collaborative single, ‘Over Now’.

In June, The Weeknd urged major labels and streaming services “to go big and public” with donations to racial equality organisations amidst ongoing Black Lives Matter protests.

Joseph Capriati confirms he is out of hospital

Joseph Capriati has confirmed he is out of hospital.

The 33-year-old DJ was stabbed in the chest with a kitchen knife following an argument with his father earlier this month (8th January), and had been recieving treatment in Sant’Anna e San Sebastiano Hospital, Caserta. Capriati’s father, 61, was arrested for attempted murder. During his recovery, Capriati asked for “a little respect for my father and my family, since neither I nor any of you have the power and the duty to judge what happened”. 

Now, the Italian artist has confirmed he has left hospital, with an Instagram post captioned “Back to life, and to music. I am forever grateful” (translated from Italian). Capriati’s agency had previously announced that his injuries were no longer considered to be life-threatening.

At the time of the event, La Repubblica reported that the incident took place during an argument between Capriati and his mother. When his father tried to intervene, it is alleged that the DJ punched him. His father reportedly retaliated by stabbing him. Capriati’s brother was also present.

You can see the post from Capriati below. 

(Photo credit: Dave Clarke)

Hernan Cattaneo’s Connected live show announced for Netflix

Hernan Cattaneo’s Connected live show has been announced for Netflix.

In 2018, Argentinian DJ and producer Hernán Cattaneo showcased four live performances at Teatro Colon. Titled Connected, the concerts were performed alongside Oliverio Sofia, Baunder, and Zuker behind the booth, a live orchestra, and four guest singers: Richard Coleman, Leandro Fresco, Oriana Favaro, and Josefina Silveyra.

Now, it has been announced that the Buenos Aires performances, which are directed by Milton Kremer, will be streamed via Netflix next month.

Connected will be streaming via the platform from the 1st March 2021.

In October last year, Tomorrowland shared a mini-documentary about the creation of its 2020 virtual festival: Tomorrowland Around The World

The same month, a documentary about Larry Levan and Paradise Garage was made available to watch online.

Dutch Government aims to allow festivals from July

The Dutch Government has said that festivals should be possible in the Netherlands from July.

After the Dutch prime minster had previously announced that nightclubs would remain closed until a vaccine was available for COVID-19, a number of festivals and trial events have announced they are planning to go ahead in 2021, following an announcement from the Dutch government regarding live events.

One festival, Liquicity, which is due to take place from the 16th to the 18th July, posted a statement to their website, explaining that the Dutch government had confirmed festivals should be able to go ahead in the country from the 1st July.

“Great news: the Dutch government has announced that they aim to allow festivals after July 1,” the statement from Liquicity said. “In case festivals still get canceled due to changing COVID circumstances, organisers are likely to be compensated for the costs. Festivals in The Netherlands are currently selling out in record pace due to this new government announcement.”

Liquicity also promised full refunds if the event should end up being cancelled — “in case festivals still get canceled due to changing COVID circumstances, organisers are likely to be compensated for the costs” — and another festival, Lowlands, has announced that two trial events will take place later this year, with 3000 participants expected to present negative COVID-19 tests on entry.

Meanwhile, in the UK, Glastonbury 2021 has officially been cancelled due to coronavirus, but festivals of a smaller scale could take place safely this summer with proper coronavirus measure in place, MPs have been told. Speaking to the House of Commons Culture Select Committee last week, Rowan Cannon of festival organisers Wild Rumpus said that, with social-distancing and appropriate safety measures, small festivals should be “as safe as Sainsbury’s”.

“The idea that the festivals can’t go ahead and be socially-distanced is inaccurate,” she continued. “We can absolutely adapt our programming, put infrastructure in place, [and] change the way that we do things, to enable something to happen with social distancing in place.”

Cloverdale and FWLR take it back to the ‘Old School’

Cloverdale and FWLR take it back to the ‘Old School’Screen Shot 2020 12 06 At 11.57.58 AM

Canadian tech house innovator Cloverdale had a phenomenal 2020 that saw him land an EP release on Confession Records, launch his own audiovisual label venture, VIBRANCY, and secure a spot on Dancing Astronaut‘s Artists to Watch in 2021 list. Now, the he’s partnered with high-octane electro house enthusiast and Monstercat frequenter FWLR to deliver an early contender for one of the top house tracks of the year, “Old School.”

The single opens with a catchy vocal suspended atop a classic acid synth. The track wastes no time hitting its first break, which boasts more acid rave synths intertwined with piano shots, groovy drums, and a handful of other unique sounds. The second drop continues the vibe while introducing higher-energy rave stabs. The best collaborations are the ones that highlight both artists’ unique skills and sounds, and “Old School” fluidly does just that.

The post Cloverdale and FWLR take it back to the ‘Old School’ appeared first on Dancing Astronaut.

Nurko shares Insomniac drive-in stream featuring the grand reveal of his Illenium and Dabin IDs

Nurko shares Insomniac drive-in stream featuring the grand reveal of his Illenium and Dabin IDsScreen Shot 2021 02 06 At 1.08.34 PM

Nurko has deservedly remained the topic of Twitter conversation in the wake of his drive-in performance for Insomniac’s running Park ‘N Rave series at the NOS Events Center. The 50-minute stream, aired on January 30 as part of the MitiS-hosted evening in San Bernardino, has now officially been uploaded to Insomniac’s YouTube, allowing all those who didn’t catch the set the night of to see just what dance music fans on Twitter have been buzzing about.

At this point in time, we all know Nurko set tall expectations for his virtual streams following Digital Mirage, and the “Blindspot” producer corroborated his election to Dancing Astronaut‘s Artists to Watch in 2021 with yet another emphatic showing behind the decks. The two moments of the stream that undoubtedly had everyone chiming in were the grand unveilings of both “Sideways” with Illenium and Valerie Broussard, one of our 15 highest-priority IDs headed into the new year, as well as “When This is Over” with Dabin and Donovan Woods. The ID train didn’t break off at just those two, however, as Nurko also flashed an upcoming release with Monika Santucci and a suspected collaboration with both ARMNHMR and Micah Martin.

Stream Nurko’s entire Park ‘N Rave set below.

Featured image: Nurko/Twitter

The post Nurko shares Insomniac drive-in stream featuring the grand reveal of his Illenium and Dabin IDs appeared first on Dancing Astronaut.

Inside a note: explore minimalism with Björk home studio visits

“It’s very brave to look complex things in the eye and say, calm down.” Some Björk TV clips from the 90s explore minimalism, immediacy, tiny handheld instruments, and the work of the late Mika Vainio.

So let’s start our week with some of that inspiration.

For a 1997 BBC show, the artist explored “modern minimalism” – including a visit to a glass harmonica player (involving a chicken baster!), plus the wonderful Mika Vainio (aka Ø):

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Someone surely knows what that is in the cigar box Mika has (or even who made it); it seems to be an Atari Punk Console-derived creation. (This breed of electronic instruments makes mayhem with a 555 timer chip and originates – as far as I know – with famed inventor/author Forrest Mims.)

For her part, Björk explains that she does a lot of her work “in her head” – and of course with that distinctive, powerful voice and its esoteric melodic utterances. So her creative setup is accordingly arranged around immediacy.

Indeed, the funny thing about the history of studio recording is how many artists worked to escape them – and perhaps even their imposed order. Instead, Björk created informal, living room-style by taking over a villa in Andalucia to make Homogenic, and added to some designed disorder:

Other unorthodox methods of recording were used during the production, including Björk wanting to record outside on the porch and using non-professionals to help with production, such as Rebecca Storey, who was hired as a babysitter but added to the production staff after showing interest in the equipment.

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That sounds pretty good to me, especially as all of us live in a world of relative chaos at the moment. It might remind as artists to lean in, make more chaos and disorder, and hit record.

Since 2021 brings many people still more time at home, sometimes in small flats, here’s a cute little clean-floor setup of tiny instruments. Being partial to tiny music devices, I can only nod approval.

This isn’t 1994, as some note that the Yamaha QY22 wasn’t out yet. I’m guessing it’s also in the 1995-97 timeframe. You likely can’t understand the conversation, but rather just marvel that Icelandic adds as many diacritics to the word “studio” as I think any language does:

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The Yamaha QY22 is itself charming. Introduced at the time as a “VHS video cassette-sized style sequencer” – see, the 90s are longer ago than we remember – it bears an early resemblance to today’s smartphone music apps.

[ Image ] QY22

In turn, it owes serious resemblance to the little-known but groundbreaking Philips PMC-100, a tape cassette-and-membrane keyboard all-in-one studio, designed by pioneering inventor Lyndsay Williams. (She went on to Microsoft Research and as I recall a lot of interaction design firsts.)

For more recent hits, here’s Far Out this week noting the roots of some creative sound design – pushing Celemony’s pitch-warping processor Melodyne to the breaking point and then some:

What’s That Sound? How Björk really created electricity on her song ‘Thunderbolt’

Refresh your memory on that one:

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Bonus – mistakes, pain, and Estonian legend Arvo Pärt in conversation:

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SoundCloud will soon let fans pay artists directly

The new model will be announced soon according to Billboard

Declan McGlynn

Monday, February 8, 2021 – 10:46

SoundCloud will soon introduce a new streaming model that will let fans pay artists directly. Billboard initially reported the news, which is yet to be confirmed by SoundCloud, but is expected to offer fans the chance to pay artists directly similar to Patreon and OnlyFans. It’s a system that’s already in place with Chinese streaming platforms Tencent Music’s QQ Music. Tencent owns a large slice of Spotify, who also introduced ‘tipping’ in April last year, with mixed results. As it stands, subscriber revenue is pooled and distributed to the artists who brought in the most streams. It’s not yet clear if SoundCloud will pivot to payments based on individual fan streaming, rather than a pro-rata payment system that currently exists. 

Direct payment models have seen an increased demand as artists struggle to make up the revenue lost from cancelled tours and live shows via streaming. Late last year SoundCloud announced they were profitable for the first time, up 37% year on year in 2019. 

You can read the full Billboard report on SoundCloud’s potential new payment system here.

Dutch Government aim to allow festivals from July

The Dutch Government has said that festivals should be possible in the Netherlands from July.

After the Dutch prime minster had previously announced that nightclubs would remain closed until a vaccine was available for COVID-19, a number of festivals and trial events have announced they are planning to go ahead in 2021, following an announcement from the Dutch government regarding live events.

One festival, Liquicity, which is due to take place from the 16th to the 18th July, posted a statement to their website, explaining that the Dutch government had confirmed festivals should be able to go ahead in the country from the 1st July.

“Great news: the Dutch government has announced that they aim to allow festivals after July 1,” the statement from Liquicity said. “In case festivals still get canceled due to changing COVID circumstances, organisers are likely to be compensated for the costs. Festivals in The Netherlands are currently selling out in record pace due to this new government announcement.”

Liquicity also promised full refunds if the event should end up being cancelled — “in case festivals still get canceled due to changing COVID circumstances, organisers are likely to be compensated for the costs” — and another festival, Lowlands, has announced that two trial events will take place later this year, with 3000 participants expected to present negative COVID-19 tests on entry.

Meanwhile, in the UK, Glastonbury 2021 has officially been cancelled due to coronavirus, but festivals of a smaller scale could take place safely this summer with proper coronavirus measure in place, MPs have been told. Speaking to the House of Commons Culture Select Committee last week, Rowan Cannon of festival organisers Wild Rumpus said that, with social-distancing and appropriate safety measures, small festivals should be “as safe as Sainsbury’s”.

“The idea that the festivals can’t go ahead and be socially-distanced is inaccurate,” she continued. “We can absolutely adapt our programming, put infrastructure in place, [and] change the way that we do things, to enable something to happen with social distancing in place.”

Chris Lake levers jacking basslines in his remix of Miane’s ‘Who Are You?’

Chris Lake levers jacking basslines in his remix of Miane’s ‘Who Are You?’Chris Lake Vegas

Chris Lake has delivered a dominant remix of Miane’s “Who Are You?,” releasing the track on his very own label, Black Book Records. The swift tech-house original receives a rejuvenated lift from the veteran British producer and DJ, who takes over in ruling fashion with climatic resonance and jack-house grooves. On his latest remix, Lake shared,

“I’ve been watching Miane for a few years now and I’ve been really enjoying her tracks. As soon as she sent me ‘Who Are You?’, I knew it was right for Black Book. Thank you for all the support on the record so far!”

The thrusting rework follows the decorated house producer’s collaborative four-track EP with Armand Van Helden, The Answer. Continuing strong into 2021, Lake’s first entry of the year is destined to smash dancefloors in times to come.

Hear Chris Lake’s remix of Miane’s “Who Are You?” below.

 Featured image: XS Nightclub

The post Chris Lake levers jacking basslines in his remix of Miane’s ‘Who Are You?’ appeared first on Dancing Astronaut.