Paul van Dyk announces interactive audiovisual live set, streaming this weekend

Paul van Dyk’s next Sunday Session live stream will feature an interactive light show.

On 10th May, the trance legend will provide a live set to coincide with Lux Partum, “An interactive light and sound installation” housed at the Motorwerk engine plant in Berlin.

The massive light installation, which can be found on the Lighting.Stream website, will be synchronised with van Dyk’s set from 7pm CEST on the 10th.  The lights can also be partially controlled by visitors to the website, which will officially launch this Friday 8th May. “Visitors become part of the installation and can share the experience with other visitors. The idea is to take part in a live show in a new way and to be together in a new way under the given circumstances.”

Lux Partum, which is Latin for light emission, or generative light, will be live for until 18th May. 

Paul van Dyk’s live Sunday Sessions have been getting increasingly creative as the coronavirus lockdown has gone on. Last week, he played a three-hour live set at Ballspielverein Borussia’s Dortmund stadium.

In April, van Dyk shared a new album, ‘Escape Reality’, comprising 16 stripped-back and ambient reworks of some of his biggest hits, including ‘For An Angel’.  

Make Noise 0-CTRL Offers Touch-Controlled Desktop Sequencing

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Make Noise today introduced the 0-CTRL, a patchable, clockable controller and step sequencer for voltage controlled synthesizer systems.

Designed to complement the 0-Coast synthesizer, the 0-CTRL is a tabletop device whose inputs and outputs follow Eurorack standards, so it can also be used with a modular system or other cv/gate synthesizers.

Features:

  • Fully analog and patch programmable, with no menus or modes
  • Sequence and Control the Pitch, Strength, and Time of your synthesizer voice, per step
  • Voltage control over Stop and Direction
  • Dynamic Reset, select Reset Step while sequencing
  • Pressure and Touch Gate outputs for human generated events and expression
  • Dynamic Envelope and Gate outputs allow for voice loudness/ strength per note
  • Gate output per step for patch programming sequence behavior and triggering unique events per step
  • Synchronize the 0-CTRL via the Clock In, or clock other machines with the Clock and/ or Gate Outs
  • Sequence your synthesizer and play it by hand simultaneously with Sequence Interrupt
  • Pairs well with the 0-Coast, Tape & Microsound Music Machine, or anything having CV Inputs

Pricing and Availability

The Make Noise 0-CTRL is available now for $399 USD.

Make Noise 0-CTRL is the controller-sequencer followup to 0-Coast

There have been few surprise hits in the world of patchable instruments like Make Noise’s 0-Coast. But they just might have another hit – a tabletop, patchable, clockable controller-sequencer. And it’s adorable – and US$399.

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This is an all voltage-minded sequencer. So you can control everything with a combination of patching and knob turning – direction, pitch, strength, time, and more. It’s also intended for use with expressive instruments, as there’s not only gate outputs per note/step, but also dynamic envelopes and loudness.

(Click for larger versions.)

That’s already enough to set the 0-CTRL apart from the rigid world of hardware sequencers. And that world tends too often in one of two extremes – either hands-on control that locks you into 16 steps and assumes you just want rigid triggers and no expression, or overly complicated and unmusical step editing that typically involves menu diving. (Ewww.)

But the other clever conceit of the 0-CTRL is to assume you might want to take over from the sequencer and play. So Sequencer Interrupt lets you play by hand, even simultaneously as the sequence is running.

Plus, nothing I can say in words really matches how cute, cheery, and clear the 0-CTRL looks. Now, normally things that make sound wildly out-sell things that don’t, which does tend to favor the 0-Coast over the 0-CTRL. But this thing is so clever and clear, I can imagine it might win over converts even outside the usual Make Noise and 0-Coast fandom.

0-CTRL, bottom, with the original 0-Coast, top.

And, of course, maybe the kids now are reading for microtonality! (I mean, it’s great!)

“There is a whole world of mood and emotion and musical setting that can be achieved with microtonal melodic playing,” says Tony Rolando of Make Noise in a prepared statement. “There is no exact prescription, you’re just tuning until it sounds the way you want it to sound.”

Oh, and don’t miss the Time row! “The Time row allows you to introduce the “slop” of how people naturally play,” he says. “Sometimes that slop is the magic, and is what gets the groove going.”

This is what independent design gives you – genuinely new stuff that springs from someone’s imagination, not only from something you’ve already seen before.

So, use it with a modular, or use it with the increasing amount of very affordable gear that now uses analog patching, too.

Specs:

  • Fully analog and patch programmable, no menus or modes, what you patch is what you get! 
  • Sequence and Control the Pitch, Strength, and Time of your synthesizer voice, per step
  • Voltage control over Stop and Direction
  • Dynamic Reset, select Reset Step while sequencing
  • Pressure and Touch Gate outputs for human generated events and expression
  • Dynamic Envelope and Gate outputs allow for voice loudness/ strength per note
  • Gate output per step for patch programming sequence behavior and triggering unique events per step
  • Synchronize the 0-CTRL via the Clock In, or clock other machines with the Clock and/ or Gate Outs
  • Sequence your synthesizer and play it by hand simultaneously with Sequence Interrupt
  • Pairs well with the 0-Coast, Tape & Microsound Music Machine, or anything having CV Inputs

Product page:

http://makenoisemusic.com/synthesizers/ohctrl

Apply Reason anywhere: Pro Tools support with Reason AAX plug-in

Reason’s approach: use their workflow wherever you want, in whatever DAW you want. And now, in case there was any doubt, they’re adding an AAX-format plug-in for Pro Tools users.

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All of this makes sense in the grand history of Reason. The company formerly known as Propellerhead first made Reason work as a virtual rack of gear inside any DAW using the company’s own ReWire technology. But now, plug-ins are generally the accepted way to go for most software integration to provide the same essential functionality. You want to sync the two sets of tools, transfer audio between them (and drag-and-drop files, where appropriate), and sequence patterns and parameters. Plug-ins have generally gotten better at doing that, and modern plug-in formats have 64-bit support so they can use all that memory you’ve got crammed into your computer.

So plug-ins, it is. You don’t get to run the full version of Reason inside your DAW, as you did with ReWire, but the current Rack approach probably makes more sense for most workflows, anyway.

It’s just usually Pro Tools users who now get left out. Also part of a long tradition, Pro Tools is still a little more demanding of its third-party developers.

Reason gives you a choice.

Pro Tools and Reason, back together.

You can run Reason Rack (the essential instruments, effects, and routing from Reason) inside your DAW. Or you can run your favorite plug-ins inside Reason.

You can run both VST and AU plug-ins, Mac and Windows, inside Reason. And now you can run Reason itself in your DAW as VST or AU or Pro Tools’ AAX.

There’s not another tool that is that agnostic about how you want to work. The closest equivalent is probably Image-Line’s FL Studio, which makes some of its bigger instruments and effects available as individual plug-ins (something Reason Studios doesn’t do). But while FL Studio can run as a plug-in, it can only do so as a VST. And individual plug-in support is a bit spotty on the Mac.

Reason remains one of the most powerful sets of virtual instruments and effects you can find. It’s certainly the kind of thing you can get lost in on quarantine.

If you’re a Pro Tools user, I’m curious how it works for you.

Reason 11.3 includes the AAX plug-in and other improvements and fixes, available now for free for registered Reason 11 users. (And they’ve updated their website, too.)

More:

https://www.reasonstudios.com/en/reason/buy

Akai Pro MPC 2.8 Adds New MIDI Capabilities & More

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Akai Professional has announced MPC 2.8, a new update for its current MPC hardware / software ecosystem.

MPC 2.8 introduces a variety of new MIDI capabilities, letting you use the MPC X, MPC Live and MPC One as the sequencing ‘brain’ of your MIDI studio.

Here’s what’s new:

  • MIDI Multi Capability – With MPC 2.8, you can simultaneously connect and route all the MIDI gear in your studio, including class-compliant USB Keyboards, MIDI interfaces and USB to CV modules. Fuse this with deep internal MIDI routing capability across tracks, comprehensive MIDI routing to any MIDI compatible synthesizer, drum machine or sound module, and even multitrack recording capability, and MPC 2.8 can be the center of complex production and performance setups.
  • Timing Correct (TC) has now been tweaked to have a dedicated On/Off setting that is separate to the TC division parameter.
  • From the standalone MPC firmware, you can now create a custom note mapping for any program type.

Pricing and Availability:

MPC 2.8 will be available on May 14th as a free update of MPC 2.0 users. See the Akai Pro site for details.